Health Insurance

Indicator: 
Health insurance coverage status by race and ethnicity and sex and age.
Outcome(s): 
Healthy people based on low morbidity, high quality of life, and life expectancy.
Significance: 

Health insurance coverage improves access and quality of medical care and contributes to the overall health of Americans. Health insurance is not only helpful during illness but can also help to prevent illness by covering preventable care including immunizations, physical exams, and dental check-ups.

Data (click image for interactive version): 

Percentage of population without health insurance coverage, by age, greater Portland region, 2010 -2012 one year estimates

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, Table B27001

Percentage of population without health insurance coverage, by race and ethnicity, greater Portland region, 2009-2012, one year estimates

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, Table S2701

Notes: Data for some groups is not available for every county each year due to small sample sizes. Unavailable data includes: Black or African American – Clackamas County (2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012); American Indian or Alaskan Native – Clackamas and Clark Counties (2009 and 2010) Washington County (2011) and all counties (2012); some other race – Clackamas County (2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012) and Clark County (2009 and 2010); Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone all counties, all years.
Click image to see 2009-2011

Percentage of population with health insurance coverage, greater Portland region, above/below national average (85.2%), 2012, one year estimates

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, Table B27001

Note: Figures include only the civilian noninstitutionalized population.

Percentage of population under 18 with health insurance coverage, greater Portland region, above/below national average (92.8%), 2012, one year estimates

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, Table B27001

Note: Figures include only the civilian noninstitutionalized population.

Percentage of population aged 18 to 34 with health insurance coverage, greater Portland region, above/below national average (74.0%), 2012, one year estimates

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, Table B27001

Note: Figures include only the civilian noninstitutionalized population.

Percentage of population aged 35 to 64 with health insurance coverage, greater Portland region, above/below national average (82.5%), 2012, one year estimates

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, Table B27001

Note: Figures include only the civilian noninstitutionalized population.

Percentage of population ages 65 and over with health insurance coverage, greater Portland region, above/below national average (99.1%), 2012, one year estimate

For the 65+ population, nearly all of the greater Portland region is within a close enough margin to the national average as to be statistically insignificant. There are five areas that do have significance: Central East Portland (99.7%), West Portland (99.7%), Gresham/East Multnomah County (100%), Lake Oswego/West Linn/Wilsonville/Canby (99.8%), and East and Central Beaverton/Cedar Mill (99.7%).

Finding & Trends: 

In the greater Portland region, rates of health insurance coverage vary by age, with adults age 18-34 were the group most likely to have no health insurance. In 2012, 24.2 percent (+/-1.9) of adults age 18-24 and 25 percent (+/-1.3) of adults age 25-34 years old reported not having health insurance coverage. The chances of lacking health insurance coverage decreased with age. Adults age 44-54 were 59 percent more likely to have health insurance coverage than adults age 18-24. Adults age 65 years and older reported the highest rates of health insurance coverage.

With the exception of adults 65 years and over, children were less likely than adults to lack health insurance coverage. In 2012, 3.2 percent (+/-0.8) of children 0-5 and 6.1 percent (+/- 0.9) of children 6-17 lacked health insurance coverage.

Rates of health insurance coverage vary across racial and ethnic groups. In 2012, people identifying as "some other race" have the lowest rate of health insurance coverage (35.9 percent uninsured +/-2.9). Those reporting Hispanic or Latino ethnicity also have low rates of insurance coverage with 28.2 (+/-1.9) percent uninsured. Fewer than 12 percent of people who identified as white alone, non-Hispanic reported being uninsured.

Outer East Portland and West and Central Vancouver had the smallest percent-insured populations, consistently below the national average in all age groups except under 18. Central East Portland has the largest percent-insured population across all age groups, and along with a few other PUMAs, it places well above the national average in all adult age groups. Most areas have relatively consistent comparisons with national averages, but for children under 18 there is more variability; some PUMAs with high percentages of insured individuals in other age groups have lower percentages for minors, and other counties, vice-versa. Adults aged 65 and over are the most consistently insured.

Driver(s): 
Dental care
Behavioral/mental health
Long-term support
Education
Economics
Using the indicator to drive change: 

Children and older adults have more access to health insurance than do adults aged 18-64. Although health insurance is widely available to children in Oregon and Washington through the Oregon Health Plan and Apple Health for Kids, many children are not covered because their parents are unaware of the programs or how to access them. Health insurance coverage also varies across ethnic groups. By identifying places where gaps in insurance coverage exist, we can work to expand existing programs to reach a greater number of people.

Methodology: 

Supporting documentation on code lists, subject definitions, data accuracy, and statistical testing can be found on the American Community Survey website in the Data and Documentation section: http://www.census.gov/acs/www/data_documentation/

Sample size and data quality measures (including coverage rates, allocation rates, and response rates) can be found on the American Community Survey website in the Methodology section: http://www.census.gov/acs/www/methodology

Data are based on a sample and are subject to sampling variability. The degree of uncertainty for an estimate arising from sampling variability is represented through the use of a margin of error (MOE). The value shown here is the 90 percent margin of error. The margin of error can be interpreted roughly as providing a 90 percent probability that the interval defined by the estimate minus the margin of error and the estimate plus the margin of error (the lower and upper confidence bounds) contains the true value. In addition to sampling variability, the ACS estimates are subject to nonsampling error.  The effect of nonsampling error is not represented in these tables.

The health insurance coverage category names were modified in 2010. See ACS Health Insurance Definitions for a list of the insurance type definitions: http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/hlthins/methodology/definitions/acs.html

The above text is from The US Census Bureau.

The geography for health insurance is the greater Portland region which includes Clackamas County, OR;  Multnomah County, OR; Washington County, OR; Clark County, WA.  Please note that the geography used varies across different indicators.

Disclaimer: 
This indicator is based on information from credible sources. However, changes in collection methods and statistical procedures that have occurred over time may affect the data presented. Limitations that are acknowledged by the sources are noted above. Nevertheless, caution should be taken when interpreting all available data.
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